Random Production Thoughts


#1054

Something by Zoom might come close, but in general no I don’t think so.
Most people with a good amount of synths will have some Zoom multi pedal lying around though.
Maybe it’ll even be hooked up. You could also try to find a good deal on an Ensoniq dp/2 or dp/4.
Other options could be a Yamaha XPS or Kaoss Pad.


#1055

lol kaoss pad are you fucking me? thats not even remotely similar

also I cant find any information on what a yamaha XPS is. ensoniq dp2 looks like some bulky rack POS


#1056

I’d argue a Kaoss pad is fairly similar. Both are compact stereo multi effects with a lot of different
possibilities and they are both really easy to operate on the fly. The Kaoss has pretty shitty reverbs though. Altogether you’ll get more out of the H9 for sure.

XPS was a typing error. The line is called Yamaha SPX. They are good quality multi effects that
you can pick up for cheap. Also a rack unit though like the Ensoniq dp, which is a highly sought
after unit because they sound really good on synths, they have a ton of programs and they’re not too expensive.

If it has to fit in the pocket of your overzeas jeans, maybe the Modfactor could be an option.
But I figured you looked at that one because it’s also Eventide.


#1057

I picked up one of these and it is really good:


#1058

That first video is Pure VIBES.
Ripped the audio for future home listening.


#1059

The pedal sounds really good. I too was thinking of getting the Eventide H9 but wasn’t ready to spend $500 on the basic model. That vid helped me make the decision on the Zoom MS-70CDR. I got it for about $120 I think.


#1060

I wish I had the money for a bunch of hardware…


#1061

Damn I was on the money.

I used that exact pedal at a friend’s place. It’s lush.
Feel like the H9 is worth the money though. I don’t have it, but Steve O’Sullivan once walked me through it while we were sound checking his stuff. Think it was just a live setup thing for him though.


#1062

The H9 is great! Eventide sounds so nice. I have a couple of their plugins including the Blackhole reverb which you can get for the H9. I still wouldn’t mind picking up one of the H9’s but it was between spending $500 or $100.

I’m liking the Zoom. I was convinced after hearing demos and reading reviews.

So with the H9, you can get the Core with 2 algorithms for $399, the regular with 9 algorithms for $499 or the Max with 49 algorithms for $699. They are all the same box, just with different amounts of algorithms loaded.


#1063

is this even remotely similar?


#1064

what originally made me want the eventide is this video

so lush


#1065

I think that is more of an amp simulator for guitars. The MS-70CDR is lush reverb, chorus and delays. It for guitars as well but also very suitable for synths.


#1066

these guys make some of the best free plugins Ive found

use their compressor, saturator and stereo expander on every track I make, now theyve also added a reverb plugin to this free bundle

https://www.meldaproduction.com/MFreeFXBundle


#1067

Be prepared for constant emails.

I bought the MMultiAnalyzer which is pretty decent. You can load it on all of your tracks to see the frequencies all at once.


#1068

Objekt’s production manual

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YTd_6RsLmyw1NndNbhdmxS6347dA349D/view

this part stands out to me as being some very good advice:

"7.3 A suggested method

Obviously you first need to get the track to the point where you’ve got 60% of the struc-
ture and 50% of the mixdown sorted, otherwise it’s not ready for this treatment yet. But

once you’re there, give this a try.

  1. At the start of every session, open up Notepad (or equivalent) and make a blank
    text file.
  2. Open up iTunes, not your DAW (or you’ll end up fiddling with stuff). Listen to the
    mixdown from the previous session. It is very important that you don’t fuck around

16

with the sounds at this stage. Just listen to what you’ve done, ideally from start to
finish.

  1. As you listen through, write down things that don’t quite sound right, and the cor-
    responding time in the track. For example, ‘2:50 - bass doesn’t drop hard enough’,

‘1:30 - maybe this drop should come earlier’, ‘3:00 - get rid of those second hihats’
4. Listen a couple more times if you don’t feel you had enough time to write down
everything you’d like to change.
5. You should now have a list of specific things that are wrong with your WIP. Maybe
there’s 1, maybe there are 15, whatever. It’s probably best not to write down more
than 15 or so per iteration.
6. Now open up your DAW and open the last version of the project you were working
on. Click ‘Save as’ and increment the number on the end.
7. Go through your list. Address on the things on your list, one by one. Do not work
on anything else. If you have any brilliant ideas, write them down at the end of your
idea list and do them at the end.
8. Once you’ve addressed everything on your list, save your project and make a new
mixdown. Number the mixdown according to the project number.
Repeat.
The really important thing is that every idea that you act upon must first be written down.
That way, you don’t lose track of what you set out to achieve.

I think it’s relevant when it comes to thinning a track down to the necessities and avoid-
ing clashes, because as you listen to a mixdown you can write down the exact points

where you feel the energy isn’t at quite the right level, certain things are clashing, some-
thing is missing, etc."


#1069

I feel this is too german though. I mean who has the integrity to do that?


#1070

It’s definitely something I’ve done. I get sidetracked otherwise and end up not focusing on the elements i need to fix. I start adding shit, switching things up. The problem is then only half sorted and buried under a bunch of other stuff I started or changed.


#1071

I have to do this because I’m always wasted when doing this stuff and forget everything lol


#1072

This seems like good advice

you always have dead obvious solutions in mind when youre listening outside your daw, it’s like “oh duh I just gotta loop this bit longer and ditch this other section” but then when all the tools are in front you a track can become an undecipherable puzzle.

It gets especially annoying with drums, when you previously thought they where sick but they’re getting annoying to listen to and you fuck around with them while in this annoyed, impatient headspace, stripping them down or making them overly noodly to the point where they completely loose the original groove. Then later fire up an older version and realize what you had before was actually p good


#1073

used to have a somewhat similar workflow of taking notes and iterating over it

finished a lot more tunes then, should probs start doing it again :thinking:

@cyclopian where’s this objekt production manual from? i swear at least that part you quoted is familiar from back when he still posted in the old forum but the 2016 date is throwing me off edit: nevermind, am dumb and just clocked the note that says its made from his Q&A there