What dubstep tune are you feeling today


#1031

#1032

just as big as channel two :nogunfinger::nogunfinger:



#1033

#1034



#1035


AAAAAA I’VE BEEN SEARCHING FOR THIS TUNE FOR 2 YEARS AND I’VE FINALLY FOUND IT TODAY AAAAAAAAAAAAAA


#1036


So dark, so wobbly, so 06. Even the most off grid and wobbliest off grid tune of recent times doesn’t come close


#1037

#1038

Miss the type of tunes that were made between 03-07


#1039

freemans


#1040

yo i didn’t rate this when i first heard the skull disco comp

this is so hard man, fuck


#1041

omg what a plate !@#$ was listening to this 7-8 years ago, had a plan to collect them slowly and since then… I got nothing ehh


#1042

There’s been a comment on Skull Disco’s discogs page for a year now that has my inner truhed historian raging:

Great experimental dubstep label similar to Hotflush Recordings. Contained in the 3 years and dozen or so of releases constituting the inspiration for what would be briefly termed ‘post dubstep’ soon after the label’s demise with a bevy of sounds breaking free from dubstep’s usual 2-step drum pattern and incorporating tribal rhythms and occasional 4/4 beats.

While not having used either of these things for the first time within dubstep, the output of Shackleton, Appleblim, and friends would go on to popularise a preference for deep and rolling tracks without unnecessary frills such as mid-range bass. Setting the stage for Kryptic Minds and Kaiju to soon after popularise their famous ‘dungeon dub’ sound.

Skull Disco made little noticeable impact until well after their demise, with many of their contemporise such as Scuba, Martyn, 2652, Pinch, and Joy Orbson seeming to take note. And have influenced later artists such as Paleman, Boddika, Mumdance, Ipman, Jack Sparrow, and many others.

Shackleton continues to produce music and preform. As does Appleblim, who has since started their own label with a similar focus on boundary-pushing dubstep, Apple Pips.


#1043

speaking of the scubster/hot flush


#1044

Fuck ain’t heard wormsign in years. Never heard the scuba one though, biggie


#1045

Yeah, big ups Gravious whateva yr doing nowdays.
Wasn’t Widowmaker a regular ninja around 09…made lots of tracks.


#1046

so what has you angry about that Junkyard?


#1047

Ah, I’m just being pedantic.

This paragraph. I’d argue that the early output of Loefah et al. had a much bigger impact on “dungeon dub” (who called it that?) than Skull Disco; Kryptic Minds were heavily locked into the half step groove and didn’t take many cues from Shackleton’s and Appleblim’s rhythmic explorations. You could make a case for Circling / Over Here featuring a more dub techno vibe that KM picked up on, but again, Pinch’s Tectonic was equally influential in that regard.
Kaiju were superlate to the party and – no disrespect – jumped the waggon; they didn’t help start it off.

Skull Disco crew didn’t “popularise a preference for deep and rolling tracks without unnecessary frills such as mid-range bass”; it was the sound at the time, with the exception of Coki (minus the unnecessary frills bit).

Additionally, the whole piece completely disregards the main achievement of Skull Disco (and Hessle Audio): popularising the sound with the Berlin house and techno DJs like Ricardo Villalobos, Perlon’s Zip and Berghain mainstay Ben Klock, kicking off a short period of very fruitful crosspollination between the scenes: Hard Wax’s Torsten Pröfrock prominently contributed remixes and collaborations to Skull Disco under his T++ guise, Shack went on to release on Perlon, Ben Klock included a full-fledged dubstep tune on his debut LP, “One”… Get mi?


#1048

Not dubstep but are played in grime sets though…



#1050

To showcase your own work, please refer to the #dubs category.


#1051

Thanks!